Addressing the Venezuelan Refugee Crisis: Part II

Photo Credit: UNICEF Ecuador

By Aanvi Jhaveri
Staff Writer

Converging crises in Venezuela have forced residents to abandon their homes to seek safety and security. Part I of this series explored the complex history that has led to the current plight of refugees and asylum-seekers. Understanding the causes behind the humanitarian crisis today enables a comprehensive analysis of programs and policies enacted in response to the arrival of migrants. Part II will critically examine these approaches and analyze potential long-term recommendations for neighboring countries and Venezuela. 

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Show of Hands: Enrollment in Early Education in the United States versus Denmark


Research has shown that high-quality ECEC lessens the inequality gap between children of disadvantaged and advantaged backgrounds, increasing the income potential and opportunities for upward social mobility for low-income children later in life. Thus, the US should follow in the footsteps of Nordic countries by improving its ECEC system.

By Charlotte Armstrong
Contributing Writer

Denmark has some of the lowest levels of inequality in the world, while the United States has some of the highest levels of income inequality among industrialized nations. This leads to a variety of detrimental effects on residents of the U.S., including their individual opportunities for upward social mobility. This cycle of inequality begins with children, and the quality of education they are given at an early age. 

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Dictatorship in Hungary Raises Serious Questions about EU and NATO Membership

Victor Orban, Hungarian Prime Minister, meeting Donald Tusk, former President of the European Council. Image used under Creative Commons License.

By Maxwell Lyster
Staff Writer

On March 30, the Hungarian Parliament voted 137 to 53 to give the autocratic, nationalist Prime Minister Victor Orbán the right to rule by decree indefinitely. The proposal was rammed through by his party, the Fidesz, which holds 117 of the 199 seats. While many other nations have given leaders excess power during the global pandemic, Hungary is different in the sense that Orbán can even cancel elections and suspend the enforcement of certain laws at his own discretion. He can also judge who is spreading misleading information and throw them in jail. Orbán has been given near-total control of Hungary for the foreseeable future. 

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