Turkey at the Centennial – Part II: A Nation at the Crossroads of Continuity and Change

Read Part I of this series here.

Photo Credit: sulox32

By Shawn Rostker
Editor in Chief

It is from the rise of the AKP that Turkey’s current president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, ascended to power. Erdogan’s emphasis on the horizontal ties of solidarity that bound together the people of Turkey rather than the vertical ties of obligation that bound society to state helped elevate him to political prominence. During his time as Prime Minister (2003-2014), the AKP pursued an aggressive reform agenda aligned with its contemporary vision. Economic stabilization programs continued, and ties between foreign commercial and private industry were expanded. Steady declines in the rule of law and fiscal health have led to a running five-year decline in overall economic freedom, and Turkey’s economy has consistently ranked near the bottom of regional and global indexes. It has rebounded from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, growing by 11% in the past year. Still, it remains plagued by inefficiencies across its vital sectors and susceptible to long-term effects of the ongoing war in Ukraine.

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Op-Ed: The NBA’s Recent Capitulation to COVID Skepticism and its Distortment of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Photo Credit: Paxton Holley

By Andrew Campos
Director of Operations

1992 was a simpler time. “The Dream Team” —  the outstanding 1992 U.S. Men’s Basketball Team that heralded the legendary likes of Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, and Larry Bird — collectively sought to earn a Gold Medal after the American team had lost to the Soviet Union in the 1988 Summer Olympics. The “Dream Team”  went for gold and inevitably succeeded, and in doing so demonstrated the tenacity and formidable athleticism of American basketball players. The 1992 U.S. Men’s Basketball Team enshrined themselves as cultural leaders in the realm of basketball, inspiring basketball fans abroad. More importantly, at this time, a global pandemic had yet to dramatically alter the lives of billions of individuals across the world.

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Under the International Radar: Refugees and Restrooms

While going to the restroom is a fleeting thought in the daily lives of citizens in urban spaces, as mundane as breathing or walking — for refugees, deciding to use a restroom can be a costly consideration and mean putting their safety at risk.

By Jasmine Moheb

Staff Writer

For many of us living in the richest countries in the world, we do not experience the challenges of only having access to restrooms that are over capacity, lack proper safeguards such as doors and locks, and are exposed to outside dangers. However, this is a reality that is faced daily by communities that have been displaced from their homes and are facing uncertain living conditions. Refugees compose a substantial number of the 4.2 billion people in the world that do not have proper access to toilets, according to the United Nations Human Rights Commission. Just one example from the Democratic Republic of the Congo shows that about 55 percent of the 7,217 refugees who arrived in Mulongwe since 2017 have constructed their own latrines due to insufficient facilities. Something that should be a basic necessity is severely limited among those who do not have permanent homes.

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